People

Past IILJ Scholars

The Institute for International Law and Justice each year selects a small group of outstanding J.D. students as IILJ Scholars. The Program provides carefully tailored individualized mentoring and opportunities to this group. Scholars work closely with the Law School's permanent and global faculty members in international law on joint research projects. They participate in the development of ideas and scholarship with other IILJ J.D. and Graduate Scholars from around the world, and with Visiting Fellows and Researchers. They are carefully selected to draw upon, and enrich, an exceptionally fertile and energetic intellectual environment. We list below past IILJ Scholars by the year of their JD graduation, many continued and completed an LL.M. in a subsequent year.

2013

J.D.

Hannah Bloch-Wehba

Hannah Bloch-Wehba

A New York City native, Hannah graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Texas, where she majored in history and Plan II Honors, in 2009. While at UT, she taught writing at the Undergraduate Writing Center, ran a tutoring program matching honors students with local high schoolers, and edited the university's literary journal, Analecta. She received special honors for her thesis on presidential war powers. After graduating, she received a DAAD scholarship for graduate study in Germany, where she interned at Internationale Politik, a foreign affairs publication, and studied international relations. As an IILJ and Law and Security Scholar, she plans to focus on international humanitarian law, constitutional law, and the law of the war on terrorism.

Matt Craig

Matt Craig

Matt Craig attended the University of North Carolina as a Morehead-Cain Scholar. He studied Political Science and Spanish, earning highest honors for his thesis on the normalization of U.S.-Cuban relations. While at UNC, Matt served as executive director of a non-profit organization that provides scholarships and other educational opportunities to students in Tanzania. After completing his undergraduate studies, Matt received a Specialization in Armed Conflict and Peace at the Universidad de Los Andes in Bogota, Colombia, where he was a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholar.

As an IILJ and Root-Tilden-Kern Scholar at NYU, Matt has pursued his interests in national security law and human rights litigation. He has interned with the ACLU National Security Project, EarthRights International, and Alien Tort Statute specialist Paul Hoffman in Los Angeles. He has served on the board of the Iraqi Refugee Assistance Project and currently participates in the Immigrant Rights Clinic. Matt hopes to continue to be involved in impact litigation after law school.

Upon graduation, Matt Craig was  awarded the Open Society Presidential Fellowship and will spend 2013-2014 working at the Open Society Institute.  In 2014-2015, Matt will clerk for The Honorable Allyne R. Ross at the U.S. Distrcit Court, E.D.N.Y. 

Elspeth Faiman Hans

Elspeth Faiman

Elspeth graduated summa cum laude from Bowdoin College where she majored in International Relations and Russian and minored in Economics. During college, she also studied in France, Russia, and Washington, D.C. After graduating, Elspeth served for two years as a Peace Corps Volunteer in a small rural village in Mali. Upon returning to the US, she worked for three and a half years at Management Sciences for Health in Boston, where she managed public health projects in Nigeria, Ethiopia, Southern Sudan, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. As an IILJ scholar at NYU, Elspeth’s research has focused on the development of Global Administrative Law in international environmental and public health organizations. Elspeth spent the summer after her first year at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s regional office in Philadelphia, and the summer after her second year in the Appellate Section of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Environment and Natural Resource Division in Washington, D.C. Elspeth is an executive editor for NYU’s Journal of International Law and Politics, where her student note will be published during the 2012-2013 academic year. She is also an active member of NYU’s Environmental Law Society.

Adria Gulizia

Adria Gulizia

Adria graduated Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude, from Washington University in St. Louis in 2008.  While there, she majored in French language and literature, a course of study to which she had been dedicated since spending a term in Grenoble, France as a senior at Phillips Exeter Academy. Adria used her background in French language and culture to anchor her interest in the circulation of peoples, goods and ideas around the Mediterranean, an interest that prompted her to begin studying Arabic and increase her mastery of Italian. After graduating from Washington University, Adria remained in St. Louis, where, for two years, she taught mathematics at Gateway Middle School as a Teach For America corps member. She spent the summer prior to entering law school practicing her Italian by traveling in northern Italy with her Milanese husband. During the summer of 2011, Adria interned for the American Friends Service Committee's Immigrant Rights Program in Newark, NJ. She gave assistance to immigrants and refugees by taking statements, doing legal research and writing, translating documents from French to English and interpreting between French and English. She spent her 2L summer as a summer associate at Debevoise & Plimpton LLP. As an IILJ scholar, Adria hopes to explore international economic law and international financial law. Beginning in 2013, Adria will begin work at Debevoise & Plimpton LLP.

Elena Lobo

Elena Lobo

A native of Washington, DC, Elena graduated magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa from Brown University with a degree in International Relations concentrating on race and culture within the African Diaspora. At Brown, Elena was President of the Cape Verdean Students Association and a member of New Works World Traditions, a dance company committed to raising awareness for political and cultural issues through West African and modern dance performance. Upon graduating in 2008, Elena traveled to Mali with the company to study Mande dance and collaborate with local activists to advance malaria prevention. She has worked at the International Monetary Fund in the Monetary and Capital Markets Division and at Foley Hoag LLP as a paralegal in their International Litigation and Arbitration Practice. During the summer of 2011, Elena interned in the Civil Division of the US Attorneys Office for the Eastern District of New York and participated in the 2011 Copenhagen Competition on Access to Food. During the summer of 2012, Elena was a summer associate at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP and spent a month working in the firm's Sao Paulo office. Elena was a member of NYU's Moot Court Board during her time at NYU Law. Upon graduation, Elena will begin work at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

Alex Sinha

Alex Sinha

Alex has a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Toronto, where he specialized in normative ethics and bioethics. Before earning his Ph.D., Alex graduated Phi Beta Kappa, magna cum laude with Honors in Philosophy from the New York University College of Arts and Sciences, where he majored in Philosophy and Religious Studies. While in law school, Alex has focused on legal philosophy, human rights and humanitarian law. Alex's paper, "Modernizing the Virtue of Humility" recently appeared in the Australasian Journal of Philosophy, and his paper, "Child Soldiers as Super-Privileged Combatants" is forthcoming in the International Journal of Human Rights. Alex spent his 1L summer working for the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice and serving as a research assistant for Professor Smita Narula; and he spent his 2L summer at the Brooklyn Neighborhood Office of the Legal Aid Society. As a 3L member of the International Human Rights Clinic, Alex has worked on matters relating to indigenous rights issues and terrorism. Upon graduation, Alex will join Human Rights Watch and the ACLU as the Aryeh Neier Fellow. 

Carson Thomas

Carson Thomas

Born and raised in Carson City, Nevada, Carson studied English and Spanish at Carleton College, where he graduated summa cum laude in 2006.  While at Carleton, he lived in Madrid and then received a Larsen Fellowship to pursue his grandfather’s narrative in Chile.  He earned a M.A. in Comparative Literature from Dartmouth College, focusing his research on the adaptation and appropriation of Shakespeare in pre-Civil War Spain.  Carson then taught culture and conversation classes for a year at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey.  He also led groups of American teenagers in Spain and conducted teacher-training workshops in Mexico and Nepal for the Rassias Foundation of Dartmouth College.  Although Carson has traveled extensively, his outlook remains informed by the mountains and deserts of his home.  He worked to protect and develop natural resources as a professional ski patroller, state park employee and conservation steward.  Carson spent his first law school summer interning in Geneva at the United Nations' International Law Commission. He researched and edited proposals for the codification and progressive development of public international law, and his projects included the Protection of the Environment In Relation to Armed Conflict and International Cyber Law.  As an IILJ Scholar and legal professional, he hopes to mediate conflicts at the intersection of international environmental and human rights law.

 

LL.M.

Kaveri Vaid

Kaveri Vaid

Originally from Rochester, NY, Kaveri Vaid graduated from Williams College in 2004 with honors in English Literature.  After graduation, she taught math and science in New Orleans for Teach for America.  Kaveri then moved to New York City and spent four years at Carnegie Corporation of New York, working on immigration and education reform grantmaking programs.  She also completed a MA in Political Science/International Relations at Columbia University in 2007.  During the 2009-2010 academic year, she worked as a research assistant for the Center on Law and Security, and during the summer of 2010 Kaveri worked for the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court in the Hague.  In 2010, she was, with the NYU team, a semifinalist in the Jean-Pictet Competition in International Humanitarian Law.  She is a Senior Articles Editor for the NYU Journal of International Law and Politics for the 2011-2012 term.  Kaveri's research interests focus on international criminal law, the laws of war, and international and national security, and particularly how those areas of law intersect with international relations, and she is eager to pursue work in these areas as an IILJ Scholar.

 

2012

J.D.

Valerie Brender

Valerie Brender

Valerie graduated magna cum laude with honors in Economics from Wake Forest University in 2006. Her senior thesis on the formation of the “Chicago Boys,” a group of economists that transformed economic policy during Pinochet's dictatorship in Chile, was published in the Spring 2010 edition of The American Economist. After graduation Valerie served for two years in Panama with the Peace Corps. In Panama, she worked with a rural microfinance cooperative and served on Peace Corps Panama's Gender and Development (GAD) board. After the Peace Corps, she was awarded a Fulbright teaching grant to Spain. While in Spain she taught in a bilingual public school and worked with a Spanish refugee group, CEAR, on translations and human rights research. Valerie spent her 1L summer working for Paul Hoffman on Guantanamo Bay, Alien Tort Statute and other international human rights litigation cases. From 2010-2011 she chaired the Iraqi Refugee Assistant Project’s TCN Project, which filed a series of FOIA requests concerning the labor abuses against and trafficking of third country nationals on U.S. military bases in Iraq and Afghanistan.  She spent her 2L summer working for the ACLU’s Center for Democracy on human rights and national security litigation. As a Root-Tilden-Kern and IILJ Scholar, Valerie has enjoyed exploring human rights litigation and corporate accountability.

 

Thomas Earnest

Thomas Earnest

A native of rural northern Alabama, Thomas graduated with highest honors from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2007 where he majored in International Affairs with a minor in the Philosophy of Science and Technology. He is a former member of the Board of Directors for the U.S. Fund for UNICEF, a recipient of the U.S. State Department's Critical Language Scholarship to Cairo, Egypt, and a former Fulbright Research Scholar and affiliated scholar of the Centre d'Etudes Maghrébines à Tunis in Tunisia. Prior to law school, Thomas was also involved in several political campaigns at the state and federal level. At NYU Law, Thomas was active in the Iraqi Refugee Assistance Project and was an Articles Editor for the NYU Journal of International Law and Politics. As an IILJ Scholar, his research interests focused on international and national security, foreign investment and development.   Thomas spent the summer following his 1L year at the ACLU's Washington Legislative Office working on national security and privacy issues. During his 2L summer, he was a summer associate at major law firm in Houston, Texas. Starting in the fall of 2012, Thomas will be an associate at Cravath, Swaine & Moore, LLP in New York City.

 

Nikki Reisch

Nikki Reisch

Nikki graduated Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude from Yale University in 1999, with a degree in Ethics, Politics and Economics. She spent the next decade working on human rights and environmental issues in international development policy, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Following graduation, Nikki was a public health sector volunteer with the Peace Corps in Senegal for over two years. From late 2002 through 2007, Nikki managed the Africa program of the Bank Information Center (BIC), a Washington DC-based organization that works to democratize development decision-making, safeguard rights and ensure accountability in the operations of the World Bank and other international financial institutions. Much of her work at BIC focused on human rights, natural resources, international trade and development, with a particular emphasis on the impacts of oil, gas and mineral extraction in Africa. After working as an independent consultant, whose projects included co-authoring a report on the climate impacts of the Iraq war, Nikki moved to London in 2008, where she spent the year prior to law school as the Policy Advisor on Forests and Climate Change at the Rainforest Foundation UK. In this post, she examined the implications of global climate policy for forests and forest-dependent peoples, particularly in the Congo Basin, and participated actively in the UN climate negotiations. She spent her 1L summer working on climate policy and environmental litigation at the Center for Biological Diversity in San Francisco, and supporting international human rights litigation at EarthRights International in Washington, DC. During the summer of 2011, Nikki was a legal intern with the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice, where she worked on a study investigating the links between violations of economic and social rights and gender-based violence in Haiti, and litigation on behalf of clients seeking redress for abuses committed as part of the CIA's secret detention and rendition program. As a Root-Tilden-Kern and IILJ scholar at NYU, Nikki seeks to strengthen and diversify the tools she can bring to the struggle for global justice. She is particularly interested in human rights, international economic and environmental law, corporate accountability and civil litigation.

 

LL.M.

Julian Arato

Julian Arato

Julian received an M.Phil in Intellectual History and Political Thought from King's College, Cambridge University in 2008.  He wrote his dissertation on A.V. Dicey's constitutional theory, focusing the non-legal normative elements entailed in the concept of a constitution—the "conventions" and "principles" of a constitution.  Julian graduated magna cum laude from Columbia College in 2007, where he studied history and philosophy. As an IILJ Scholar at NYU, Julian has focused on the sources and structure of public international law, writing in particular on techniques of treaty interpretation over time (his published work is available on SSRN, here).  During the summer of 2009 Julian worked at the United Nations International Law Commission, contributing to the topic “Treaties over time.”  The following summer, in 2010, Julian worked as a Stagiare / Study Visitor at the European Court of Human Rights in the Research Division.  He was Senior Articles Editor on the NYU Journal of International Law and Politics for the 2010-2011 term, and has represented the School of Law at the Phillip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition in 2010 and 2011.  During the summer of 2011, Julian worked at Freshfields Bruckhaus & Deringer in the Dispute Resolution Group, assisting in litigation and international arbitration issues.

J. Benton (Ben) Heath

Ben Heath

Ben graduated with high honors from the University of Texas at Austin, with a major in philosophy and a minor in American studies.  At Texas, he was the editor-in-chief of the Daily Texan, one of the country's largest student newspapers. From 2006-08, he worked as a copy editor, first as an intern for the New York Times news service, and then professionally for The Advocate in Stamford, Conn.  During the summer of 2009, he worked with the United Nations International Law Commission in Geneva, contributing to draft articles on the "protection of persons in the event of disasters." In 2010, he worked with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies on the topic of civil-military relations in disaster relief.  Ben holds a J.D. from NYU Law, where he was editor-in-chief of the NYU Journal of International Law and Politics, a coach of the NYU Jessup Moot Court team, a finalist in the Jean Pictet Competition on International Humanitarian Law.  Ben's thesis project centers on the role of international organizations as emergency managers.  His research interests include international organizations, the law of war, disaster response, legal theory, international criminal law, and global administrative law. (SSRN page here). In 2013, he will serve as a judicial clerk for Judge Robert D. Sack of the U.S. Court of Appeals (Second Circuit).

 

2011

J.D.

Elizabeth Ashamu

Elizabeth Ashamu

Elizabeth graduated phi beta kappa from Yale University in 2006 with simultaneous Bachelor's and Master's degrees in African Studies. During her time at Yale, she traveled to Morocco to study Arabic, spent her junior year in Egypt at the American University in Cairo, and conducted field research in Guinea and Senegal for her Master's thesis on the history of Lebanese immigration to West Africa. Following graduation, she interned with children's and women's rights organizations in Togo. She then lived in Rwanda, where she contributed to documenting the genocide and supporting justice efforts with African Rights. Immediately before coming to NYU, Elizabeth held the position of Africa Program Coordinator with Rights and Resources Group, a coalition that works to increase household and community ownership, control and benefits from forests and trees. She has particular interests in transitional justice, African customary legal systems, and natural resource management.

 

Christine Chiu

Christine Chiu

Christine graduated from Stanford University in 2005 with a B.A. in Human Biology, concentration in International Development. She then moved to New York where she worked for two years as a grant writer at Human Rights Watch, writing foundation grants and reports for the Africa, Middle East and North Africa, Children's Rights, and Refugee Policy Divisions, among others. Christine spent the last year in Kigali, Rwanda where she worked as a Program Manager for Orphans of Rwanda, an organization that sends orphans and other vulnerable youth to university in Rwanda. She interned for the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal in Arusha, Tanzania through a CHRGJ human rights fellowship in the summer of 2009.

 

Wamiq Chowdhury

Wamiq Chowdhury

Wamiq graduated in 2006 from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, where he focused on international law and international economics. While at Princeton he worked with the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee, analyzing rural education reform efforts. He then spent two years working at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC, where he researched issues in political economy in the Western Hemisphere, including energy cooperation in the Western Hemisphere and the policymaking effects of Mexico's dependent economic relationship with the US. He also helped develop Young Professionals in Foreign Policy in the Classroom, a program aimed to enhance education of international affairs in D.C. area schools. During summer of 2009, he interned with MP Kwaku Boateng, who represents the Berekum Constituency in the Ghanaian Parliament, as a legislative aide/policy planner. He focused primarily on ways to empower the local farmers and improve infrastructure to strengthen the agricultural base of the area. As an IILJ scholar, Wamiq hopes to explore issues in international economic law and development.

 

Margaret Graham

Margaret Graham

Margaret graduated summa cum laude from Dartmouth College in 2004 with a B.A. in Earth Sciences.  During her time at Dartmouth, she interned at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory and conducted ice core research in Greenland.  Her honors senior thesis examined carbon and sulfur cycling in soils, and was incorporated into a paper in the Journal of Geophysical Research.  Margaret continued soil chemistry research after graduation in the Dry Valleys, Antarctica.  She then worked in Benin for three years as a Peace Corps volunteer, coordinating the environmental efforts of the local government.  Margaret has also worked as a research and policy assistant for the Connecticut General Assembly.  As an environmental law and IILJ scholar, Margaret looks forward to exploring the developing field of international environmental law.

Joanna Langille

Joanna Langille

Joanna received an M. Phil in International Relations from Balliol College, Oxford, where she studied as a Commonwealth Scholar and worked for the Global Economic Governance Program.  Her research at Oxford focused on the role of the World Trade Organization in governing regional trade agreements.  She has worked at the WTO (where she helped to implement the Transparency Mechanism for regional trade agreements) and the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development, as well as on trade-related projects for the Commonwealth Secretariat and Munk Centre of International Studies at the University of Toronto.  At Oxford, Joanna also co-founded the G8 Research Group – Oxford, a fifty-person research team dedicated to monitoring the G8’s commitments on climate change.  In 2006, Joanna graduated from the University of Toronto with a Joint Specialist in Philosophy and Political Science in 2006, where she studied on a Millennium Scholarship.  As a Furman and IILJ Scholar, Joanna is excited to pursue her interest in legal theory and global governance.

 

2010

J.D.

Brian Abrams

Brian Abrams

Brian graduated with a Masters in Law and Diplomacy in 2006 from the Fletcher School at Tufts University where he focused on security studies and public international law.  Following Fletcher, Brian worked on proliferation and illicit finance issues at the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence.  In 2005, he interned in the Political-Military Bureau of the U.S. State Department and worked on the establishment of the Global Peace Operations Initiative, a G-8 program to develop global peace and stability operations capacity.  Brian graduated magna cum laude from Tufts University in 2001 with a double major in History and Political Science.  He has also held positions at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the International Institute of Boston, the Human Rights Documentation Exchange, Foley & Lardner LLP, and Goodwin Procter LLP. During the summer of 2009, he worked on international arbitration and trade issues at a law firm in Washington DC before attending the general course on public international law at the Hague Academy for International Law. As an IILJ Scholar, Brian's interest is focused on international law regarding the use of force and legal issues surrounding the involvement of regional organizations in peace and stability operations.

 

Tess Bridgeman

Theresa Bridgeman

Tess received a Masters of Philosophy in International Relations in 2006 and is currently completing a D.Phil. at Oxford University where she studied for three years on a Rhodes Scholarship.  Tess also worked with the Global Economic Governance Programme in Oxford as a research coordinator and was Associate Managing Editor of the Oxford International Review.  Prior to attending Oxford, Tess worked at the World Bank Inspection Panel – an accountability mechanism established to conduct independent investigations when communities allege they have been harmed by Bank-funded projects. She graduated from Stanford University in 2003 with Distinction in Human Biology, an interdisciplinary program combining natural and social sciences.  Tess is a 2002 Truman Scholar, received a Dean's Award for Academic Accomplishment, and is a 2003 John Gardner Fellow.  In 2000, she co-founded Puente a la Salud Comunitaria, a non-profit organization that conducts community development, food security , and women's health programs in Oaxaca, Mexico.  As a Root-Tilden-Kern and IILJ Scholar at NYU Law School, Tess has continued working on accountability of international institutions.  She has presented findings and recommendations from her D.Phil. to U.S. Congressional staff, World Bank Executive Directors, and civil society groups, and is assisting in drafting related legislation.  In Summer 2008, Tess was a law clerk for the Senate Judiciary Committee, working for the Chief Counsel on Senator Dianne Feinstein’s Subcommittee on Terrorism, Technology, and Homeland Security.

 

Ted Cardos

Ted Cardos

Ted Cardos grew up in Kansas City, Missouri and in 2002, graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Missouri, with degrees in Philosophy and Political Science. He then moved to South Africa for two years, where he completed a post-graduate course in Film and Television Production at the Cape Town International Film School. While there, Ted represented CTIFS at an international TV competition with a project about the discrimination of the disabled, and worked on documentaries about homophobia in African society and the stigma of AIDS in South Africa. After film school, Ted worked in Frankfurt, where he wrote a film script about Apartheid, which was bought by a German TV company. Back in the States, he was Assistant Director on the TV show, "Elimidate". Looking for a new challenge, he took an internship on the "Africa and Human Rights Subcommittee" in the House of Representatives. Most recently, Ted worked in Lithuania on a BBC news feature about the expansion of the EU visa zone and its effects of Belarusian bargain hunters. His focus as IILJ Scholar includes human rights and corruption issues.

 

Nikhil (Niki) Dutta

Nikhil Dutta

After graduating Magna Cum Laude in chemistry and Physics from Harvard in 2002, Niki worked in the Peace Corps in Kazakhstan for two years, and later worked in Azerbaijan for the American Bar Association's Central and European Law Initiative on anti-corruption and rule of law initiatives, acquiring reasonably fluent Russian during that time. He completed the two-year Masters of Public Affairs program at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton immediately before starting at NYU Law School, where he is particularly focused on law and development issues. Nikhil currently serves as the Editor in Chief of the NYU Journal of International Law and Politics.  He spent his first summer at NYU working on the Access to Justice Project at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU, and split his second summer between the Brooklyn Family Defense Project and Catholic Charities Immigration Services.  At NYU, Nikhil has worked closely with Prof. Kevin Davis on IILJ's Financing Development project, with Prof. Richard Stewart on the Global Administrative Law project, and with Prof. Benedict Kingsbury on IILJ's Indicators Project.

 

David Jacobson

David Jacobson

David earned his B.A. in History from Columbia University in 2006. He is primarily interested in transatlantic approaches to the Middle East, and he has a background in U.S., German, and Middle Eastern politics. Most recently, David worked at the U.S. Department of the Treasury Office of Terrorist Financing and Financial Crimes in Washington, where he focused on international money laundering activity and laws. He spent 2006-2007 at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, a policy think-tank where he researched terrorist groups and state sponsors of terrorism, U.S. and European security interests, and counterterrorism and sanctions programs. David has worked for the American Jewish Committee in Berlin, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's historical research division, the Anti-Defamation League's Government and National Affairs Office in Washington, and the Investigative Project on Terrorism in Washington.  He has lived and studied in both Germany and Israel and speaks fluent German and Hebrew.  In 2009, he was a summer associate at Proskauer Rose in New York working on international art restitution litigation involving claims of art stolen during the Nazi regime. During the 2009-10 fall semester, he will be a visiting student at Georgetown University and return to NYU during the spring. As an IILJ Scholar, his interests lie in legal issues pertaining to relationships between the United States, European Union, and Middle Eastern states.

 

Do Hyun Kim

Do Hyun Kim

After high school in Paris, Do Hyun returned to Korea and graduated first in her class at the Ewha Women's University - her thesis there on Korea's legislation against human trafficking was published in Harvard's Korea Policy Review. She then worked for the South Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, where she was actively involved in negotiation of the South Korea-US Free Trade Agreement.

In the summer of 2009, she worked as a summer associate at the New York office of the international law firm Skadden Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, focusing on cross-border transactional work, especially M&A and project finance.  The year before that, in the summer of her 1L year, she worked at the New York office of Nixon Peabody, focusing on labor law and public finance matters.  As a current Senior Executive Editor of the NYU Law Review, Do Hyun is actively involved in the journal's production process and is also concentrating on developing her own Note on international arbitration, a topic inspired by the IILJ Scholars' Seminar and Scholars' Conference in which she participated during her 2L year. As an IILJ Scholar, she focuses particularly on the implications of international economic law for development agendas and for East Asian security and cooperation.

 

(Sophy) Qian Wang

(Sophy) Quian Wang

Sophy went to Fudan University in China in1996 and earned a Bachelor’s degree in philosophy in 2000. Three years later she received a M.Phil degree in philosophy from the University of Hong Kong. Professor Chad Hansen supervised her M.Phil thesis “Comparative Studies of the Justification of Punishment.” In the same year she began her Ph.D. study at the Philosophy Department at Tulane University in New Orleans. Professor Bruce Brower directed her dissertation “John Rawls’s Ideas on Human Rights”, which she defended just before she started law school. In the summer of 2009, she was a summer associate at Blank Rome LLP's New York office.

 

LL.M

Mitra Ebadolahi

Ebadolahi

As an IILJ Fellow, Filomen D'Agostino Scholar, and Paul & Daisy Soros Fellow at NYU Law, Mitra specialized in international and domestic human rights, particularly economic and social rights and the human rights implications of counterterrorism law and policy.  A 2002 graduate of UCLA, Mitra received her BA in international development studies and history.  She then received a Fulbright Scholarship to attend the London School of Economics, where she completed an MSc degree in Politics of the World Economy in 2004.  As a JD candidate, Mitra worked at the Constitutional Litigation Unit of the Legal Resources Centre in Johannesburg, South Africa; participated in NYU Law's International Human Rights Clinic preparing Freedom of Information Act requests and researching enforced disappearances in the War on Terror; and worked with the ACLU's Immigrants' Rights Project.  In 2007-08, Mitra served as the Senior Notes Editor for the NYU Law Review, writing her own Note on strengthening the judicial enforceability of economic and social rights in South Africa.  After completing her JD, Mitra went home to Los Angeles to clerk for Judge Margaret Morrow, U.S. District Court, Central District of California, in 2008-09.  She then returned to NYU to undertake the thesis-based LL.M. in international legal studies, completing her coursework in 2010 and her thesis in 2011.  In 2010-11, she clerked for Judge Betty Fletcher of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in Seattle, Washington.  She is now the inaugural Nadine Strossen Fellow at the ACLU's National Security Project in New York City, where she litigates civil rights cases confronting government abuses stemming from post-9/11 law and policy.

 

Megan Donaldson

MeganDonaldson

Megan studied law and arts at the University of Melbourne.  After completing an honours thesis in 2006 on aspects of the French Revolution, she spent a year in a commercial firm, was admitted to practice, and in 2008-2009 undertook an associateship with the Honarable Justice K M Hayne of the High Court of Australia. While at university, Megan was a member, assistant editor and ultimately co-editor of the Melbourne Journal of International Law.  She was the editorial assistant for the Public Law Review, and for Anne Orford (ed), International Law and Its Others.  She undertook research work in international and constitutional law, and has recently co-authored a chapter on “Values in Australian Constitutionalism” for a collected work exploring the possibilities and limitations of reference to values in comparative constitutionalism. At NYU she undertook an LL.M. in Legal Theory, with a focus on history and international law.  

 

2009

J.D.

Seth Gurgel
Seth Gurgel

Seth grew up in Lake Mills, Wisconsin and attended Lakeside Lutheran High School. He graduated from Marquette University in May of 2002 where he majored in English Literature and Political Science. At Marquette, he was a Wisconsin State Scholar and a member of Marquette's Burke Scholar Program, a public service scholarship program. While in Milwaukee, he coordinated various service and social justice organizations dedicated to seeking solutions to hunger and homelessness issues through service. As coordinator of the student organization JUSTICE, Seth organized numerous panel presentations and teach-ins on diverse topics, most notably the UN Oil-for-Food Program in Iraq and the United States response to terrorism. Upon graduating, he received the College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Senior Award, the College's highest award.  After graduation, Seth volunteered with the Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE), an Americorps teaching program administered by Notre Dame. Seth taught ninth and eleventh grade English at Bishop Kenny High School in Jacksonville. In July 2004, he graduated from Notre Dame with a Master's of Education and a much greater understanding of air conditioning's influence on the recent settlement of the South.  In the fall of 2004, Seth began teaching English and studying Chinese at Hangzhou Teacher's College, in Hangzhou, China. Seth worked for two years in China, where he began studies on roles and limits of law in China's rapid change, which he has continued at NYU as both IILJ and Root-Tilden-Kern Scholar. He is actively involved in a project on Criminal Justice in China directed by NYU Professor Jerry Cohen.

 

Matt Haar

Matt Haar

Matt is a 2006 graduate of Brown University, where he majored in Economics and Political Science.  He also spent a year studying at Pembroke College, Oxford.  Matt has worked at the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (U.S. Department of Transportation), Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP, and currently holds an elected position as a Dickenson School Trustee in his home town of Southwick, MA.  While at NYU Matt focuses on relationships between international trade, economic development, and international institutions. He spent Summer 2007 working with Professor Kevin Davis on the IILJ's Financing Development Project.

 

Binish Hasan

Binish Hasan


Binish came to NYU from the Honors Program of the US Department of Justice Anti-Trust Division in Washington DC. She graduated form Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service in 2005. A native speaker of Urdu, and proficient in Arabic, she seeks to integrate a focus on women's rights with wider studies of international economic law and international legal institutions. In Summer 2007 she worked in ACEH Indonesia on a UNIFEM Project on anti-discrimination legislation.

 

Sandra Mayson
Sandy Mayson

After graduating summa cum laude from Yale University with a B.A. in Comparative Literature, Sandy Mayson worked for two years at a leading NGO focused on oceans and fisheries issues. In the year before coming to Law School, she taught English in France, and spent several months in Chile preparing radio documentaries on artisanal fishing and other socio-political issues. At NYU she is focusing on integrating work on legal theory with current international policy problems, particularly relating to natural resource use and human rights. She is co-organizer of a major conference at NYU Law School on climate change and human rights. In Summer 2007 she worked in Lima, Peru with an NGO on indigenous people's rights and environmental issues.

Margarita O'Donnell

Margarita O'Donnell

Margarita graduated summa cum laude with a B.A. from Columbia University in May 2006, where she majored in Political Science.  She was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and awarded the Charles A. Beard Prize for Best Paper in Political Science for a paper she wrote on disarmament and peacekeeping.  During her senior year, Margarita interned with the International Center for Transitional Justice, researching extra judicial disappearances and working on the creation of a truth and reconciliation commission in Morocco.  She also interned for the United Nations Association of the USA as a Model United Nations Trainer, the Office of the Public Advocate for the City of New York and Congressman Jose Serrano (NY-16).  Margarita grew up in Switzerland, Costa Rica, Brazil, France, the Philippines and Venezuela.  She graduated from Colegio Internacional de Caracas in Venezuela. Since graduating, Margarita has been employed as a paralegal with the Federal Defenders of New York.  In this position she was involved in every stage of the criminal defense process, including assisting clients in being released on bail, interviewing witnesses, reviewing evidence and obtaining sentencing mitigation. She also second-sat two trials.  As an IILJ and Root-Tilden Kern Scholar, Margarita is combining her interests in criminal justice, human rights and international law. In Summer 2007 she interned with CODESEDH, a leading human rights NGO in Argentina working on prosecutions related to the "Dirty War".  

 

Mila Gudkov

Mila Gudkov

Mila earned her bachelor of arts in linguistics with a minor in Arabic at the University of California at Berkeley where she graduated Phi Beta Kappa and summa cum laude in 2005. She spent the following year in Egypt, studying Arabic at the American University in Cairo as a recipient of the Center for Arabic Studies Abroad fellowship. While living in Cairo, Mila worked as an Arabic translator with several human rights organizations. She also served as an Arabic interpreter/translator for the International Human Rights Clinic at NYU from 2006-2007 and returned to Cairo in summer 2007 to work for the Housing Rights and Land Use Network as a Center for Human Rights and Global Justice Summer Fellow, conducting research on housing rights and refugees in English and Arabic. She currently serves as an articles editor for NYU's Journal of International Law and Politics and will be studying International Trade Law at University of Amsterdam in Fall 2008. Mila spent the summer of 2008 as a summer associate at Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer in New York and Amsterdam.

 

Jennifer Wheeler
Jennifer Wheeler

Jennifer graduated Magna Cum Laude with a B.A. from the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University in 2005.  At Gallatin she presented a colloquium on the application of Orientalist discourse to current conflicts in the Middle East.  Jennifer has lived in Thailand, Nepal, Ecuador and Belarus where she worked on human rights, education and sustainable development projects.  In 2003 she interned for the Global Citizen Initiative as a Youth Advocacy Coordinator, and in 2005 she interned for the United Nations Association of the USA.  At the UNA-USA Jennifer worked with the American NGO Coalition for the International Criminal Court researching the role of the ICC and the United Nations in addressing global human rights crises.  In Summer 2007 she interned in the IILJ's Program with the United Nations International Law Commission, working with ILC member Paula Escarameia and researching the development of international law in regulating cybercrime.  Jennifer’s interests include sustainable development and international criminal accountability. 

 

LL.M.

Christen Broecker

broecker

A 2005 graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Christen received highest honors in Peace, War and Defense and International Studies.  While at UNC, she participated in a summer field research seminar on international organizations and the Balkan wars in Vienna, Austria, and Bosnia-Herzegovina.  She then studied French language, politics, and art in Paris for a semester before working as a summer intern for the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe in Washington, D.C.    Christen's work in the Balkans and with the CSCE inspired her senior honors thesis on theoretical models of externally-directed state-building.  At NYU she has focused on state-building, transitional justice, and international security law.  With a fellowship from NYU's CHRGJ  she spent the summer after her first year of Law School in Monrovia, working at the Liberian Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and returned to Liberia to deepen this research for her LLM thesis.  She also worked in the IILJ's project with the Permanent Mission of Palau to the UN, and in a major law firm.

 

Alexandra Khrebtukova

khrebtukova

As an IILJ Scholar, Alexandra Khrebtukova’s research focused on the intersection between the international trade and international environmental regulatory regimes and, more generally, on democratic theory in a globalized world.  Her publications included theoretical work on the so-called fragmentation of international law, as well as discrete legal analyses of U.S. and international regulatory approaches to public goods like freedom of trade or a sustainable environment.  Her LL.M. thesis addressed the role of border tax adjustments in bridging international trade and international climate change law.  Ms. Khrebtukova also holds B.A. degrees from the Philosophy and Rhetoric Departments at UC Berkeley, where her work included a thesis on the ontology of power within the construction of social reality.  In addition to academic research, Ms. Khrebtukova’s time as an IILJ Scholar included internships with the International Law Commission of the United Nations; the litigation department at Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton and Garrison LLP; the Republic of Palau’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations; and the U.S. Court of International Trade.  She has also studied in Russia, Italy, and France.  Since obtaining her J.D. and LL.M. degrees, Ms. Khrebtukova has clerked for two judges on the U.S. Court of International Trade, and has accepted the position of Permanent Clerk to the Court’s Chief Judge starting in August of 2012. 

 

Catherine Sweetser

Catherine Sweetser graduated magna cum laude from Yale College in 2005 with a double major in Political Science and International Studies. Her senior essays focused on peacekeeping in Burundi and the repercussions of politics in the AU, as well as the formulation of a statistical variable for international interest in a conflict.  In summer 2006, after her 1L year, she performed post-conviction work for prisoners claiming to be innocent with the Innocence Project, and also worked with Professor Benedict Kingsbury on accountability for abuses by peacekeepers. In summer 2007, she held a CHRGJ Fellowship at the Legal Resources Centre in South Africa, working particularly on the consequences for constitutional rights of international investment treaties, as well as on refugee rights and sex discrimination cases. In her college summers, Catherine taught English at the Center for Exchange and Solidarity in El Salvador, worked on tenant law and Holocaust reparations cases at Bet Tzedek Legal Services in Los Angeles, and interned at the Center for Reform in London, England.  A member of the NYU Law Review, she also joined the Furman Program in Fall 2006.  She is interested in pursuing an academic career in global administrative law and human rights.

 

Bryant Walker Smith

Brian Walker Smith

As a fellow at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School (CIS) and the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford (CARS), Bryant focuses on the law and policy of autonomous and semiautonomous vehicles. His research interests include administrative law, efficiency, and public/private coordination. Prior to joining Stanford, Bryant served as a judicial law clerk to the Hon. Evan J. Wallach of the U.S. Court of International Trade and as a fellow at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. He was admitted to the New York Bar in 2009.

As an Institute for International Law and Justice Scholar at New York University School of Law, Bryant received his LL.M. in International Legal Studies in 2009 and his J.D. (cum laude) in 2008. During law school, he was president of NYU’s International Law Society, a managing editor of the NYU Journal of International Law and Politics, a summer associate in project finance at Linklaters LLP, and a summer fellow at the Austrian Ministry for Transport, Innovation, and Technology. Prior to law school, Bryant worked as a transportation engineer at Strand Associates, Inc. In this position, he advised governments and developers on the design of transportation plans, policies, programs, and facilities. He earned his B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Wisconsin.

2008

J.D.:

Alexis Blane

blane

After graduating from Duke University in 2002, Alexis went to Oxford University on a Rhodes Scholarship, and received a Masters of Philosophy from Oxford in 2004 for work that focused on the interrelation of liberalism and conceptions of empire in British travel writing from the 1930s.  As an undergraduate, a summer spent working in Kosovo on refugee management and social therapy programs kindled her interest in the intersections of national and international law.  As an IILJ Scholar she has written a paper on theories of punishment in 16th and 17th century Latin international law texts, and a note on sovereign immunity in national courts as an obstacle in investor-state arbitration.  She has served as Managing Editor of the Journal of International Law and Politics, and has worked in the IILJ's project with the Permanent Mission of Palau to the UN.   She spent the summer at the end of her second year working in law firms in London and New York. During 2008-9 she will be a clerk to Judge Allyson King Duncan, 4th Cir.

 

Anna Cavnar

Anna Cavnar photo

A 2001 graduate of Indiana University, Bloomington, Anna Cavnar studied economics and French. Following graduation, she spent two years in the Republic of Moldova as a Peace Corps Volunteer in NGO development. Her main project involved assisting two grassroots organizations, a youth center and a women’s business association, with grant writing, project design and management etc.  Concurrently with law school, Anna has pursued a Masters in Public Affairs at Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School, concentrating in international development.  Her research has focused on the international law of food aid, integrating international trade law with economic and social rights.  She has been a research assistant for Professor Kingsbury in the IILJ's United Nations Foundation-supported project developing international law materials on UN issues for use in law schools around the world.  She also worked during much of her joint degree in the IILJ's project with the Permanent Mission of Palau to the UN, and spent a summer at a leading law firm in Paris. She will hold a clerkship with Chief Judge Kimba Wood, USDC, SDNY in 2009-10.

 

Mitra Ebadolahi

Ebadolahi

As an IILJ Fellow, Filomen D'Agostino Scholar, and Paul & Daisy Soros Fellow at NYU Law, Mitra specialized in international and domestic human rights, particularly economic and social rights and the human rights implications of counterterrorism law and policy.  A 2002 graduate of UCLA, Mitra received her BA in international development studies and history.  She then received a Fulbright Scholarship to attend the London School of Economics, where she completed an MSc degree in Politics of the World Economy in 2004.  As a JD candidate, Mitra worked at the Constitutional Litigation Unit of the Legal Resources Centre in Johannesburg, South Africa; participated in NYU Law's International Human Rights Clinic preparing Freedom of Information Act requests and researching enforced disappearances in the War on Terror; and worked with the ACLU's Immigrants' Rights Project.  In 2007-08, Mitra served as the Senior Notes Editor for the NYU Law Review, writing her own Note on strengthening the judicial enforceability of economic and social rights in South Africa.  After completing her JD, Mitra went home to Los Angeles to clerk for Judge Margaret Morrow, U.S. District Court, Central District of California, in 2008-09.  She then returned to NYU to undertake the thesis-based LL.M. in international legal studies, completing her coursework in 2010 and her thesis in 2011.  In 2010-11, she clerked for Judge Betty Fletcher of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in Seattle, Washington.  Beginning in September 2011, Mitra will undertake a two-year litigation fellowship with the ACLU's National Security Project as the inaugural Nadine Strossen Fellow.

 

Andrew Friedman

friedman

Andrew graduated from the University of Georgia in 2005 with high honors and a B.B.A. in International Business. He was an intern for the Center for International Trade and Security, where he investigated natural resource dispute resolution guidelines and their application to the Spratly Islands conflict.  Prior to coming to Law School, he traveled extensively in Spain, Israel, Austrasia, and particularly in Eastern Asia, and began to learn Japanese. As an IILJ Scholar, he has continued to focus his interest in East and South-East Asia, participating for a semester in an NYU exchange program in Japan, before returning to the region for further study after completing his JD.  He worked with Professor Kevin Davis in the IILJ's Financing Development project, and on the practical design of microfinance and solar energy financing projects for the Government of Palau.

 

Leslie Gold

gold

Leslie Gold graduated summa cum laude with her Bachelor’s degree in International Studies in 2005 from American University with a minor in French and was inducted as a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She studied both in Brussels, Belgium and in Beijing, China. While in Brussels, she worked for American Electronics Association Europe, an interest group for firms in the high tech industry. While in Beijing, she interned for Lehman, Lee, & Xu, a Chinese law firm. In Washington, she interned for Representative Diana DeGette of Colorado, for the Embassy of France, and for Half the Planet Foundation, a disability-related non-profit organization. She also served as a junior law clerk for Judge Inez Smith Reid of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals. Over the summers, she held jobs at both the United States Department of Labor and the United States Department of Agriculture. Her research interests include supranational aspects of the European Union. While an IILJ Scholar, she served on the NYU Law Review, and worked at a major law firm in London.

 

Jennifer Hainsfurther

hainsfurther

Jennifer Hainsfurther graduated summa cum laude from Duke University in 2005 with a double major in Political Science and Women’s Studies. A member of Phi Beta Kappa, she won the Ole R. Holsti Award for American Foreign Policy and International Relations for her political science honors thesis. While at Duke, Jennifer studied in London and Paris, and published a paper, “The Global AIDS Crisis: How to Ensure Access to Essential Medicines in the Developing World,” in the Pi Sigma Alpha Journal of Politics.  She also interned for Senator John Edwards in Raleigh, N.C. and Washington, D.C. and worked on Barack Obama’s 2004 Senate campaign. As an IILJ Scholar, Jennifer has written papers analyzing the anti-democratic potential of international precommitments and examining the CEDAW Convention as a guarantee of women migrant workers’ human rights. Jennifer held a CHRGJ fellowship at a women's rights NGO in Malaysia during her 1L summer, and split her 2L summer between a law firm an d the US State Department Legal Adviser’s Office.  An articles editor of the NYU Law Review, she also worked with Professor Benedict Kingsbury on the IILJ's UN Curriculum project. She will be clerking with Judge Harry Edwards, DC Cir., during 2009-10.

 

Tammy Shoranick          

Tammy

A 2005 honors graduate of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, Tammy Shoranick studied international relations, law and economics. Her honors thesis paper was based on the dichotomy between state sovereignty and humanitarian intervention within the United Nations conflict resolution system.  During her time at Carleton University, Tammy worked as a research assistant at Health Canada where she provided policy advice to advance the health status of First Nations and Inuit people. In addition, she acted as a volunteer for the Canadian Council for International Law. As an IILJ Scholar, Tammy worked with a human rights NGO in Uganda, and contributed to a paper on Sudanese Special Courts related to the atrocities in Darfur, as well as serving as Developments Editor of JILP.

 

LL.M.:

Chris Bradley

Chris Bradley

Chris Bradley graduated, summa cum laude, in 2001 from Princeton University with a degree in Classics. His senior thesis dealt with the role of public rhetoric in the political structure of the late Roman Empire. Chris came to NYU from the English faculty at Oxford University, where he received an M.Phil. with distinction and was accepted into the doctoral program. His doctoral research is focused on the interaction of medieval theology, church organization, and various practices of religious resistance and dissent in medieval England. He has built on this expertise in law school by working extensively on matters of law and religion; one of his papers deals with relations between British international law doctrine and the beliefs and practices of missionaries in Victorian Britain. He is currently serving as editor-in-chief of the NYU Journal of International Law and Politics; while at NYU he has also been involved with the drafting of an amicus brief by the World Organization for Human Rights USA, and he was co-chair of NYU's Unemployment Action Center. During 2008-9 he will be a clerk for Judge Patrick Higginbotham, 5th Cir.


Tara Mikkilineni

Tara Mikkilineni Photo

Tara graduated from UC Berkeley in 2002. Before law school she worked at the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Consumer Protection and received her Masters in Comparative Politics from the London School of Economics, where she wrote her thesis on transitional policies associated with ejido reform in Mexico. Tara spent her 1L summer at the UN International Law Commission in Geneva as an assistant to Commissioner William Mansfield and split her 2L summer between a San Francisco firm and the State Department's Office of the Legal Advisor. She is an articles editor on the New York University Law Review and is currently participating in the International Environmental Law Clinic researching the trade impact on developing countries of genetically modified organisms. Tara is interested in the relationship between rule of law reform and transitional justice, and in the status of quasi-state actors under international law. She will be serving as clerk for Judge Emilio Garza, 5th Cir, during 2008-9.

 

Zoe Salzman

A summa graduate from Concordia University in Canada, Zoe worked with refugee protection and criminal justice NGOs in Montreal. While at NYU, she spent summers working on immigrants rights issues and on civil liberties issues in anti-terrorism contexts. She has been extensively involved with the NYU Center for Human Rights and Global Justice in work on treatment of detainees. She served as Senior Notes Editor of the NYU Journal of International Law and Politics. Her scholarly writing includes papers on private military companies, and on problems concerning the international law of self-defense against attacks by armed bands in the International Court of Justice's DRC v. Uganda decision. During 2008-9 she will hold a clerkship with Judge Sterling Johnson.

 

2007

J.D.

Ayana Free

Ayana Free photo

A 2000 graduate of Spelman College, Ayana Free graduated with honors in English. Her junior year, she studied abroad at the Université Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar, Senegal where she explored Négritude poetry and its influence on Senegalese cultural and political institutions. After graduating, she continued researching francophone literature in the Graduate Program of Literature at Duke University. During the summers, she worked as a graduate assistant at the Gorée Institute in Senegal, a global public service institution designed to support economic independence and democracy in Africa. As a Junior Scholar for the IILJ, she plans to research the impact of international trade policies in developing countries, particularly in Africa and Latin America. During 2008-9 she will be clerk to Judge Reginald Lidsay, USDC, Massachusetts.

 

William Van Esveld

At NYU  Law, Bill Van Esveld led the academic and advocacy activities of the dynamic Law Students for Human Rights group. He focused on gender and sexual violence issues in refugee protection as an intern with the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in Bangkok, monitored the trials of Saddam Hussein with the International Center for Transitional Justice, and worked with Human Rights Watch as part of the Law School's Human Rights Clinic to prepare a report demonstrating the wide-ranging human rights impacts of business activities. After his JD he obtained a highly competitive fellowship at a leading New York human rights NGO, where he has since worked on a variety of issues in the Middle East and North Africa. Bill also completed a PhD in English at Cornell University.

 

 LL.M

Elizabeth Sepper

Liz Sepper photo

A 2002 graduate of Boston University, Elizabeth Sepper studied history, French and Italian. She studied also in both Grenoble, France and Padova, Italy. While in Italy, she researched and wrote her senior thesis on the prosecution of rape in eighteenth-century Venetian courts. During her JD and LL.M. years as an IILJ Scholar, she worked extensively on human rights and women's rights issues, including internships at a women's rights NGO in Malaysia, and work on anti-terrorism issues at a major New York human rights NGO. Her note was published in the NYU Law Review. Her LL.M. thesis, supervised by Professor Stephen Holmes of the NYU Law School Center on Law and Security, dealt with cross-border cooperation between intelligence agencies. In 2007-8 she served as a federal court of appeals clerk for Judge Marjorie O. Rendell, 3rd Cir.

 

Emily Berman

Emily Berman received her A.B. from Duke University in 1994 where she majored in Political Science. While at Duke, she spent a semester studying in Paris, and a summer working on Capital Hill for Senator Jeff Bingaman, who represents her home state of New Mexico. Following seven years working for the sports television network ESPN, she decided make a career change and came to NYU Law School to pursue her interests in international law. Since coming to NYU, Emily has done research for the International Center for Transitional Justice and the Lawyers’ Committee for Human Rights (now Human Rights First). She is a Furman Scholar, a scholarship given to J.D. students interested in and showing an aptitude for careers in academia, and she is Editor-in-Chief of the New York University Law Review. Her Law Review Note, published in April 2005, is entitled “In Pursuit of Accountability: The Red Cross, War Correspondents, and Evidentiary Privilege in International Criminal Tribunals.” Her research interests involve the various forces that induce nations to enter into, comply with, or disregard international legal obligations. In 2005-06, Emily served as a law clerk to the Honorable John M. Walker Jr. of the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.  She then returned to NYU to undertake the LL.M., with a thesis on media regulation by the United Nations and other international agencies in post-conflict situations. Since 2007 she has been an NYU's Brennan Center Fellow.

 

Jared Schott

schott

A 2003 graduate of Stanford University, Jared Schott majored in Political Science and Economics and received honors in International Security Studies. At NYU, Jared worked on human rights issues and legal reform with several organizations in Kosovo, and was intensively involved in the IILJ's work with the Permanent Mission of Palau to the UN. His LLM thesis, analyzing the UN Security Council's Chapter VII powers as a form of emergency powers, was published in the fall 2007 volume of the Northwestern Journal of International Human Rights.

 

LL.M. 2006

Gaylynn Burroughs

Gaylynn Burroughs Photo

Gaylynn Burroughs graduated with honors from Yale University in 1999, majoring in history.  She spent two years working as Assistant to the President of the Feminist Majority Foundation, a major women’s rights NGO in Washington, DC, after serving as a high school World History and Global Studies teacher.  Gaylynn has since pursued her interests in women’s rights through internships at the International Federation of Women Lawyers in Accra, Ghana and at Global Rights, working on the Initiative against Trafficking in Persons.  A Root-Tilden-Kern Scholar at NYU Law, Gaylynn has served on the Steering Committee of Law Students for Human Rights.  Her current research interests include government responses to human trafficking and protection for trafficked persons; local implementation of international human rights law; and the creation of transnational advocacy networks. She completed her LL.M. in 2006 with a thesis on trafficking in women and children, and then undertook a judicial clerkship.

 

David Livshiz

david photo

David Livshiz (JD '05, LL.M. '06) graduated from the University of Michigan in 2002, majoring in history and economics.  He then spent several years working with various community organizations on issues stemming from the Arab-Israeli conflict, with particular emphasis on the regional role and impact of international law.  While at NYU, David interned at the Office of Chief Counsel for International Commerce at the United States Department of Commerce, where his responsibilities centered on issues of WTO and NAFTA compliance.  He was president of the International Law Society and served as a research assistant investigating global administrative law for Professors Kingsbury and Stewart.  His LL.M. thesis dealt with global administrative law issues of private regulation of international accountancy standards, and regulation of architects and other professional services under the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). David’s research interests include the formation of global administrative law and its impact on democratic governance in the area of trade regulation and competition policy, international security issues, and the formation and development of international counter-terrorism law and policy.

 

Peter Prows

Peter Prows graduated from Oberlin College with honors in Politics and International Relations in 2002.  He completed his first year of law school at Tulane University before transferring to NYU Law to pursue his dual interests in international affairs and domestic governance.  He spent the summer of 2003 working for Professor M. David Gelfand of Tulane Law on constitutional law and debt financing issues as they relate to municipal government, and for the public benefits and employment law divisions of New Orleans Legal Assistance.  After coming to NYU, Peter worked term time for the Legal Action Center of New York on health, privacy, and anti-discrimination law cases.  He then spent the summer of 2004 at the UN International Law Commission in Geneva as assistant to the Finnish commissioner Martti Koskenniemi and will be working for Professor Thomas Franck of NYU Law starting in the fall.  His own research interests include the use of force, international legal regime formation and failure, the reach of domestic civil and criminal jurisdiction, and the utility of general comparative principles in settling international disputes.  He completed the LLM in Summer 2006, with a thesis on law of the sea issues, then took up a clerkship at the International Court of Justice in The Hague. After clerking at the ICJ, Peter went to work for Judge Charles Brower of 20 Essex Street Chambers, London, as Judge Brower's private international arbitration law clerk.  Peter then entered private practice with Briscoe Ivester & Bazel LLP in San Francisco, where he practices environmental and international law.

 

Peter Norman

Peter Norman Photo

Peter Norman graduated from Yale College in 2000 with a B.A. in philosophy.  During his undergraduate studies, he also attended the Universidad de las Americas in Puebla, Mexico, where he studied Advanced Spanish and Mexican Literature.  Peter worked for two years as the Program Developer for Housing Opportunities Unlimited (HOU), a Boston-based organization that develops and coordinates social services for low-income communities in the process of redevelopment.  At HOU, he helped raise over $2 million from federal, state, and private sources to support job training, after-school enrichment, adult education, and public safety initiatives.  He also wrote HOU’s manual on providing capacity-building support for community-based non-profit organizations.  Since coming to NYU School of Law, he has served as an officer for the Program on Negotiation and Dispute Resolution and chairman of the International Negotiation Discussion Group.  As a member of Professor Gerald Lopez’s Community and Economic Development Clinic, he has continued to serve immigrant and low-income communities.  In the summer of 2003, Peter worked at DITSHWANELO: The Botswana Centre for Human Rights in Gaborone, Botswana.  His current academic interests include contemporary philosophical interpretations of the moral underpinnings of modernity and the role of participatory planning in international development.

 

2005

J.D.

Meera Lea de Mel

Meera

In her time between studying mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin and coming to NYU, Meera Lea de Mel taught 7th and 9th grade mathematics to underprivileged children.  She spent time working at the U.S. Department of Education with the Deputy Secretary's office, and in a previous life was seriously interested in a career applying mathematical research to help manage global health problems. At NYU, Meera worked on economic development prospects for places like Sri Lanka, where she spent Summer of 2003 working at a major domestic NGO on social justice and economic growth issues.  She also has a keen interest in international security issues.  She was a member of NYU's Law Review.  She also participated on both the award-winning NYU team to the Sidley-Austin IIEL WTO Moot and on the first ever NYU team to participate in the Willem C. Vis International Arbitration Moot. She later held a permanent position in the U.S. State Department Legal Division in Washington D.C. Meera then went on to work as an Attorney Adviser at the U.S. State Department's Office of the Legal Adviser, first arguing cases before the Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal in the Hague, and then traveling to Baghdad, where she served as Legal Adviser to Ambassadors Khalilzad and Crocker.  After returning from Baghdad, Meera was brought as Senior Policy Adviser to the U.S. Mission to the United Nations to work for Ambassador Khalilzad in his capacity as the U.S. Permanent Representative.  She left government to come direct Global Initiatives for Hauser, and is currently developing the law school's first initiative in Abu Dhabi, a conference on climate finance in May 2009.

 

Mark Kleyna

Before attending NYU Law, Mark Kleyna received a B.A. (1994) and M.Phil. (2002) in Anthropology from Columbia University in 1994. During the course of his studies, he spent several years in South Asia as a language fellow of the American Institute of Indian Studies and a Fulbright-Hayes researcher, studying state development rhetoric and nationalism in post-Independence India. While at NYU, Mark interned at the U.N. High Commission for Refugees in Thailand, Human Rights Watch, and the Center for Reproductive Rights, and pursued his interest in the relationship between the emergence of regional and international legal and regulatory bodies and changing notions of national sovereignty.  He is pursuing a legal career in private practice.

 

LL.M.

Nicholas Arons

A graduate of Yale College in 1998, Nicholas Arons studied Latin American Studies and International Studies. He served as the coordinator of the Iraq program at the Fellowship of Reconciliation, leading two international delegations to Iraq in 1999. He then received a Fulbright scholarship to research water politics in Brazil. His book about this experience, Waiting for Rain: The Politics and Poetry of Drought in Northeast Brazil, was published in 2003 by the University of Arizona Press.  His 2005 LL.M. thesis dealt with supply of water to poor communities, particularly in Brazil.  A Hays Fellow at NYU School of Law, he was president of the NYU American Constitution Society and co-founder of the Indigenous Law Society. He speaks Spanish and Portuguese, and has conducted legal research in Brazil, Peru, Guatemala, Holland, and Mexico. In the summer of 2002 he worked in Geneva at the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and in the summer of 2003 he was a legal intern at a non-profit law practice in San Francisco. During this LLM year he was an intern adviser to the Republic of Palau's Mission to the United Nations. During the 2005 summer he worked in Palau, representing the Vice President's office. In 2005-06 he served as a clerk for Judge Rosemary Pooler, who sits on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, then entered specialized legal practice.

 

Aarthi Belani

Aarthi Belani (JD '04, LL.M. '05) is, since 2005, an associate at the New York office of Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen, and Hamilton. She is also a Board Member of the nonprofit organization Keep a Child Alive, which provides antiretroviral treatment to children with HIV/AIDS in Kenya, Uganda, and South Africa.

Peer-Reviewed Publications:
- The South African Constitutional Court's Decision in TAC: A
"Reasonable" Choice?
, Center for Human Rights and Global Justice Working Paper No. 7 (New York: NYU School of Law, 2004)
- A Case Study in Human Rights Accountability: Haiti and the
Inter-American Development Bank, Lessons Learned from Rights Based Approaches to Health [Conference, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, Apr. 14-16, 2005] (forthcoming).

Contributed to:
- Association of the Bar of the City of New York & Center for
Human Rights and Global Justice, Torture by Proxy: International and Domestic Law Applicable to ³Extraordinary Renditions² (New York: ABCNY & NYU School of Law, 2004)
-Association of the Bar of the City of New York Committee on
International Human Rights and Committee on Military Affairs and Justice, Human Rights Standards Applicable to the United States¹ Interrogation of Detainees (New York: ABCNY, 2004), reprinted in Karen J. Greenberg (Ed.), The Torture Papers: The Road to Abu Ghraib 557-629 (2005).

-The Right to Health, World Health Organization (2002)

 

Jared Wessel

A graduate of The College of William and Mary in 2000, Jared Wessel, was elected Phi Beta Kappa and majored in economics. Jared served as an intern through the IIL&J summer program at the UN International Law Commission with Professor Bruno Simma (now Judge of the ICJ), and was a member of NYU Law’s highly successful team at the World Trade Organization Moot Court competition in Geneva. Jared wrote his L.L.M. thesis on judicial policy making in the context of humanitarian law with a focus on the International Criminal Court  on relational contract models of treaties.  His ILC paper was published in NYU's Review of Law and Social Change, and his LL.M. thesis in Columbia's Journal of International Law.  In 2005-06, Jared served as law clerk for the Honorable Judge Jane Roth of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, thereafter joined a major law firm. He is currently an Assistant General Counsel at the Office of the United States Trade Representative's Office.

 

J.D. 2004

Gayle Horn

Gayle Horn is a 2000 graduate of Yale University. She received her Master’s of Science in Social Policy from the London School of Economics, concentrating on asylum and immigration in the United Kingdom and throughout the European Union. In the summer of 2002, Gayle continued to pursue her interest in international affairs through an internship with the Department of Defense. There, she worked in the General Counsel’s Office, in the Intelligence Office, on matters related to international security. In the spring of 2003, Gayle analyzed international fisheries and marine mammal organizations for Professor Katrina Wyman at NYU Law School, as part of the Research Project on Legitimacy, Democracy and Justice in International Governance. Her LL.M. thesis and papers as an IILJ Scholar focused on the intersection between constitutional law and foreign policy, and on security issues such as the legality of Riot Control Agents under the Chemical Weapons Treaty.  In 2005-06, she held a Federal judicial clerkship in Chicago, then entered legal practice.

 

Christopher Cade Mosley

Cade Mosley has strong academic interests in philosophy and government, and majored in these fields at the University of Texas at Austin, graduating in 1999. He also attended the University of Haifa, Israel, for a semester in 1997 studying Middle Eastern Studies. He worked on a kibbutz vineyard for a season, interned for Dick Armey in Washington D.C. for a summer, worked at a political consulting firm in Austin, taught English in Seoul, Korea, for four months and on a tiny Japanese island for a year before coming to NYU Law School. At NYU Law he has concentrated on international law, particularly the task of creating international regimes to manage the negative effects of globalization while preserving its benefits.  He worked as a research assistant for Professor Richard Stewart on ways to manage such a balance in the global trade of genetically Modified Organisms and in the summer of 2003 he worked at the UN´s International Law Commission in Geneva as an assistant to the Finnish commissioner Martti Koskenniemi.

 

Peter Gutherie

A 1998 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Peter Gutherie majored in Philosophy, Politics and Economics.  He then spent two years doing community development work in the US before spending a semester teaching English in Changzhou, China.  His legal work has included internships with the International Justice Mission and the Office of the Legal Adviser at the US Department of State.  Current research interests include trafficking in persons, the use of unilateral economic sanctions, and the relationship between international and domestic courts.  Gutherie now has a permanent position in the US State Department Legal Section in Washington D.C.